The GMMP: Unity, Partnerships, Change

  on January 21, 2014
Some were all business, containing summaries of the day’s headlines or FYIs about the monitoring process. The vast majority were enthusiastic expressions of solidarity, excitement and goodwill.

“It’s a great feeling of being a part of worldwide event!” wrote Gitiara Nasreen, national coordinator for the GMMP in Bangladesh.

“It is really exciting to know people all over the world are doing the same thing… we can hardly wait to see the results!” said William, Gemma, Nonceba, Jack, George and Adaobi, a media monitoring team in Sweden. WACC was copied onto messages from media monitors in Japan, the Philippines, London and South Africa all wishing each other good luck.

“We've done it!” exclaimed an email from monitors in Georgia. “Have fun!” said another.

As Margaret Gallagher author of the GMMP 2000 and 2005 reports once said, “[the GMMP is] one of the most extraordinary collective enterprises yet organised within the global women's movement.'

The GMMP’s multi-faceted approach is unparalleled and the facts and figures that it produces have proven to be an invaluable tool for change.

The project’s quantifiable benefits are only a small portion of its merits.  Indeed, perhaps the most significant attribute of the GMMP are the national, regional and global partnerships the project generates across nations, regions and the globe, among grassroots groups, international organisations, activists, media practitioners, researchers in academia, students and all those who participate.

It is this collaborative spirit that allows the GMMP to have such an impressive scope. In 2005, monitors in over 70 countries collected data on almost 13,000 news stories. Altogether, information was collected on nearly 40,000 people—including sources, presenters and reporters—in the news.

GMMP 2009/2010 aims to have over 100 countries participating. Assuming there will be a similar breakdown on the number of sources coded per country, GMMP 2009/2010 will collect data on over 60,000 people in the news in just one day!

Aside from its broader-than-ever-before scope, GMMP 2009/2010 is important for a number of other reasons. It is intended to contribute to the Beijing + 15 review planned for March 2010 and the UN Millennium Development Goals summit scheduled for September 2010.

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Photo: Media monitors in (from top left) Croatia, Guatemala, Argentina, Jamaica, Haiti, China. GMMP 2005
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January 21, 2014
Categories:  Media&Gender Monitor

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Beijing +20: In my opinion...

The most important contribution that the Beijing Platform for Action has made to advancing gender equality in and through the media is:

Setting global standards to which governments and the media can be held accountable
Bringing coherence to and greater understanding of civil society initiatives on gender, women and media
Raising the profile of work on 'women and media' as important for addressing gender inequalities in women's lived experiences.

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