Imagine media that promotes gender justice

  on January 21, 2014

UNIFEM just issued its biannual publication, Progress of the World’s Women, which focuses on gender and accountability and asks the question: Who Answers to Women. We identify two dimensions of accountability from a gender justice perspective.

The first is answerability – that is, the ability of women and men to call for answers for the policies, programmes and resources that power-holders make available to promote and protect womens rights.

The second is corrective action – that is, power-holders, once confronted with the need for answers, must take corrective action to ensure redress.

In relation to gender justice and the media, the media"s answerability and willingness to take corrective action depends to a large extent on the push that women"s rights defenders provide, the extent to which women and men together use their power of choice to show a preference for media that promotes gender justice, and the generation of high quality content for social justice media produced by women"s human rights defenders.

One of the key assets that women are bringing – along with other social justice groups – is a purposeful use of the media to achieve broader social justice and gender justice aims, to challenge discriminatory gender norms, and make visible solutions that lead to change.

Fundamental institutional transformation in the media is imperative if we are to have a media that actively promotes gender justice. There are four areas of work ahead of us that I think are crucial and receiving too little attention.

1. The first goes back to accountability: Commercially-owned media understands its accountability in the context of shareholders and profit Back To Top

January 21, 2014
Categories:  What's New

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Beijing +20: In my opinion...

The most important contribution that the Beijing Platform for Action has made to advancing gender equality in and through the media is:

Setting global standards to which governments and the media can be held accountable
Bringing coherence to and greater understanding of civil society initiatives on gender, women and media
Raising the profile of work on 'women and media' as important for addressing gender inequalities in women's lived experiences.

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